Thursday, October 12th, 2023

Briston Maroney Presents: PARADISE!

Samia, Jack Van Cleaf, hey, nothing

$36.50 ADV / $40 DOS Get Tickets
Doors: 6:00 PM / Show: 7:00 PM All Ages
Briston Maroney Presents: PARADISE!

Event Info

Venue Information:
Brooklyn Bowl Nashville
925 3rd Avenue North
Nashville, Tennessee 37201
This event is open to all ages. Valid government-issued photo ID is required to purchase and consume alcohol. Paradise Unplugged Experience One GA Ticket Access to a Pre-Show Acoustic Performance Access to a Moderated Q&A with Briston Join Briston on the Alleys for 1 Free Hour of Pre-Show Bowling One Autographed Print/Poster Designed by Briston One Exclusive Paradise Merch Pack Tote Bag Bandana Temporary Tattoo Pack Early Entry Early-Access Merchandise Shopping *Details of the VIP Experience will be emailed to buyers about 3-5 days before the show.

A special three-night musical event LIVE at Brooklyn Bowl Nashville, returning for its second year Thursday, October 12 | Friday, October 13 | Saturday, October 14 Performances by: Briston Maroney, Samia, Hovvdy, Charlie Burg, Skullcrusher, Arcy Drive, Jack Van Cleaf, hey nothing, Olivia Barton, and Hannah Cole This ticket is valid for standing room only, general admission. ADA accommodations are available day of show. All support acts are subject to change without notice. Any change in showtimes or other important information will be relayed to ticket-buyers via email. ALL SALES ARE FINAL Tickets purchased in person, subject to $3.00 processing charge (in addition to cc fee, if applicable). Sales Tax Included *Advertised times are for show times - check Brooklyn Bowl Nashville website for most up-to-date hours of operation*

Artist Info

Briston Maroney

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For Briston Maroney, it's been a journey to arrive at the current moment. A mental, physical, emotional, and musical one. But it's left him equipped: not only with a deep understanding of self, discovered through life's trials and errors, but just as important, with a piece of art that reflects his personal growth. Sunflower, Maroney's debut album, is the culmination of the past decade of the now-22-year old's life. "It's all of the things I've been stoked about since I was 12 coming together," the wise-beyond-his-years, Nashville-based singer-songwriter says with a laugh of his striking album. "It's been a literal and physical relationship with the record as far as coming to a point where I understand what parts of me it represents, what it means to me as a person and what it means for my entire life."

Recorded between the summer of 2019 and early 2020 in LA with acclaimed producer John Congleton, Sunflower is "definitely a milestone," Maroney admits. "I'd be lying to say I didn't feel a little bit of that. And why not let yourself enjoy it?" It's also a gut-punch of fuzzy power chords ("Sinkin") and genteel acoustics ("Cinnamon"); deftly-composed pop songs ("Freeway") and hard-charging rockers ("Rollercoaster"). "I put all of myself into it," Maroney adds of the 10-track LP. In retrospect, he adds, "I definitely have this sense of calmness now. I did what I was capable of doing and I'm just glad I was around my friends and my people to help me get to this point."

An energetic live performer with a craft first honed in basements, living rooms, and jam-packed clubs, Maroney quickly developed a style steeped in the sweat and sounds of Nashville's DIY scene. After self-releasing his 2017 debut EP Big Shot and amassing a strong local fan base, Maroney ultimately attracted the attention of Canvasback Music. After signing with the label, his subsequent releases -- Carnival (2018), Indiana (2019), and Miracle (2020) -- remained entirely self-written with just a single producer credited on each project, namely Grammy Award-winning producer Tone Def and UK-based producer Jim Abbiss (Arctic Monkeys, Adele).

When Maroney began to tour the US and Europe alongside other artists, co-writing sessions became commonplace as they created music together while on the road. It was at this point he made the conscious decision that he would seek out additional songwriters and producers to work with on his debut full-length project; as Maroney's music world grew, so too did his desire for collaboration.

While Maroney is the first to admit he was 'terrified-in-a-good-way' to be working alongside top-notch talents with the likes of Manchester Orchestra's Andy Hull and venerated songwriter Dan Wilson on the creation of Sunflower, over time he came to understand a simple lesson. That being, "If you're approaching what you're doing from a place of love and kindness and passion you can be as open and flowing artistically as you want to be with your collaborators," he says. "I learned a ton from writing with those people," Maroney continues. "I think the biggest thing I took away is you get to decide how open you want to be, and you get to decide how much of a stage you want to set for emotions in songwriting."

If there was a sense of apprehension heading into such sessions, it's only because songwriting, for Maroney, has long been such a highly personal process. "It's been my journal for a really long time," he explains. "There's a beauty in songwriting. It's a scrapbook. It's a photo album. And if you're really putting your heart into what you're doing and writing songs for the right reasons, every one of them should take you back to a very specific place." For Maroney, the songs that comprise Sunflower take him along the long and winding path to the present, from his time as a young, upstart-tween musician busking at the Knoxville farmer's markets to playing dank basement gigs, sobering up amid personal struggles, and finally arriving right now at his most fully-realized self.

"Hopefully this record is representative of my journey," Maroney says, singling out the opening track "Sinkin" as summing up the record to him in a single cut. "Here's 100 percent of who I am," he says of the brash and bursting song. "It feels the most connected to my heart."

"I hope that people hear the record and see the songs as windows into what I've been experiencing and hopefully they'll relate to that," Maroney says, continuing. "I know these songs will continue to do that for me."

Working with producer John Congleton, Maroney explains, was about learning to trust his impulse. While Maroney had long been the first to question initial instincts, Congleton taught him to respect his gut. "He communicates really directly and really taught me a lot about speaking precisely and speaking about what you want to accomplish with a song and a record," Maroney recalls. "Whereas I have a tendency to be really abstract. I learned to be able to switch into that mode. He had my back the whole time."

Maroney gushes as he reflects on the session with Congleton that resulted in "It's Still Cool If You Don't." Their initial stab at writing together, "was the first experience of really letting go," Maroney contends of the song. "Just coming in and having a silly idea and being down to see where it goes." Working on "Cinnamon" alongside seasoned songwriter Jenny Owens Young, which Maroney describes as a "quieter more low-key song," was by contrast an exercise in "being all gushy" and exploring his feelings on love. "That was really fun to write a love song with someone else who was also in love with a person," Maroney offers.

Where "Rollercoaster," an older track that Maroney and his band typically closed out their sets with, was his attempt at getting a bit raucous, the track "Deep Sea Diver," which Maroney penned with Dan Wilson, was a far more meditative affair. Or as Maroney says with a laugh, "It's like, well, if this really pissed off angry rock thing doesn't work here's my best attempt at trying to be John Prine."

If anything, the process of assembling Sunflower was the best way Maroney learned to take his foot off the gas a bit and ease into his life in a more gratifying way. Where he admits at times throughout the recording process he was "squeezing it so hard," completing a brilliant debut album to him "was so much about just learning to be a little more laid back," Maroney says with a smile. "I still feel really connected to it, but I'm so stoked to share it and especially one day play it live," Maroney adds of Sunflower. "Right now, I am just so thankful and happy."

Samia

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There’s a line on Honey, the latest album from Nashville-via-NYC songwriter Samia, about Aspen Grove, a collection of 40,000 trees in the plains of North America, all connected by a single expansive root system. There’s no stronger metaphor for the audience the 25-year-old empathy engine has been generating since she began releasing music seven years ago. Her songs, her fans, her friends: one enormous, interconnected ecosystem. Honey, comprised of eleven new moments of catharsis, is by and for that organism. Set for release on January 23rd 2023 via Grand Jury Music, the album was recorded at North Carolina studio Betty’s –- owned and operated by Sylvan Esso’s Nick Sandborn and Amelia Meath. It was produced by Caleb Wright, part of the team that helmed Samia’s breakthrough 2020 debut The Baby, and a founding member of one of Samia’s favorite bands, The Happy Children. It features some of her nearest and dearest friends: Christian Lee Hutson, Briston Maroney, Jake Luppen, Raffaella. Its songs were surreptitiously road tested for her devotees while opening for Lucy Dacus, Courtney Barnett, and more. The end result is what Samia calls simply “a real community record.” “We tried to be as honest as possible and keep the songs as raw as possible,” Samia said. “We talked a lot about zooming out and zooming in, giving a lot of weight to the small moments and considering them as part of a big picture, how they factor into everything else that's happening in the world.”

Jack Van Cleaf

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California-reared singer-songwriter Jack Van Cleaf writes determined and delicate songs with poetic slant and confessional warmth. At twenty-six, Van Cleaf has taken stage at legendary venues across the country including Mission Ballroom, The Ryman, The Pageant, and Miller High Life Theatre. Intimate performances with Sofar Sounds have found Van Cleaf captivating audiences from New York City to Austin, Texas. He has opened for artists such as Noah Kahan, Briston Maroney, The Lagoons, and Taylor Ashton. Van Cleaf is currently gearing up to hit the road with Field Guide in spring of 2023.

Jack lives and writes alongside other young songwriters including Annika Bennett, Gatlin, and Ethansroom. In his songs, folk imagination dresses in cinematic production, evoking the spacious and sparse verses of Nathaniel Rateliff and Gregory Alan Isakov. His music also echoes his heroes: a directness borrowed from Kris Kristofferson and lucid spirituality reminiscent of Cohen.

Released in 2022, Van Cleaf's premiere full-length record 'Fruit from the Trees' opens like a lost suitcase. Written across a span of seven years, the ten tracks are stashed with fables and fictions, letters to high school lovers, loose change in foreign currency, and a white bandana chalked in red Texas dust. Co-produced by Jamie Mefford (Nathaniel Rateliff, Gregory Alan Isakov) and Alberto Sewald (Katy Kirby), the record soars with sonic width that melds the folk-song precision of Dawes with a rumbled raucousness suggestive of The Killers. Van Cleaf proudly introduced 'Fruit from the Trees' with a sold out release show in Nashville, TN in March of 2022.

The debut record was premiered on Atwood Magazine who sung its praises, calling it "achingly intimate, warm, and tender...a radiantly raw alt-folk reckoning." Van Cleaf's songs have garnered positive attention from editorial playlists, ranging from Jack's being featured on the cover of Spotify's 'Fresh Finds' to inclusions in 'New Music Friday (USA),' 'Fresh Finds: Folk,' 'Infinite Indie Folk' and more, plus features in Apple Music's 'New In Country,' Amazon Music's 'Breakthrough Folk' and YouTube Music's 'The New Americana.' Having lyrics that connect to so many, Van Cleaf's breakthrough song "Rattlesnake" has amassed over four million streams and his monthly listenership has organically increased from 1,400 to 370k since the song's release. Van Cleaf wrapped up 2022 with the release of his 'Music City Murder Ballad' EP, and inclusions on Spotify's "best of" roundups 'Fresh Finds Class of 2022,' and 'Fresh Finds Folk: Best of 2022.' Fresh off of Noah Kahan's winter leg of his sold-out 'Stick Season' tour, Van Cleaf released his volcanic newest single "Terrestrial Man."

 

hey, nothing

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hey, nothing is Tyler Mabry and Harlow Phillips -- two highschoolers from just outside of Atlanta, Georgia. Meeting for the first time six years ago, the immediate best friends have spent nearly every second crafting their earworm Indie-Folk since. Combining the melodic stylings of Modern Baseball with the lyrical wit reminiscent of Pinegrove, these feel-good troubadours tell us that the lost sounds of the last 20 years are back, in a big way.

Recently releasing Halloween-anthem, "i haunt your dreams," to significant support (New Music Friday, Lorem, All New Indie), the dynamic duo is set to perform a hometown Holiday show at the Masquerade in Atlanta this December. This will set the stage for the release of their debut body of work and nationwide tour, slated for Summer 2023. Needless to say, there's a big year in store for fans of the band -- Yomp!

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