Blue October

Blue October

Mona

Friday, June 14th, 2019

7:00 pm (event ends at 1:00 am)

$29.50 - $328.13

This event is 18 and over

$29.50 General Admission, $35.00 General Admission (day of show), $49.50 Club Level.

All guests must have a valid government/state issued ID for entry to the venue. No refunds.

 

TICKETS PURCHASED IN PERSON AT THE BOX OFFICE ARE SUBJECT TO A $2 TICKETING FEE.

 

All general admission tickets are standing room only.

 

ALL TICKET PRICES INCLUDE NEVADA'S 9% LIVE ENTERTAINMENT TAX

 

 

Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas is excited to offer special room discounts via Caesars Hotels & Resorts for traveling fans. For hotel rooms use promo code: BRB15 at www.caesars.com applicable for rooms at The LINQ Hotel and the Flamingo.

 

*Advertised times are for doors -- show time not available*

* Venue closes between 12am - 1am unless otherwise noted*

 

Blue October
Blue October
In this age of quotidian nihilism, of pervasive and boundless
jadedness, you might be forgiven for being taken aback when
someone says to you: “I hope you’re happy.” It’d be easy to load
that phrase with acerbic meaning, to interpret it foremost as
coming from a place of spite and sarcasm. And nine times out of
10, you’d probably be right. But in the case of seminal musicians
Blue October, the statement is disarmingly sincere.
It’s a surprise, to be sure. But “I Hope You’re Happy,” the title
track representative of the Texas outfit’s forthcoming body of
work in both word and sound, is the first burst in a salvo of
overwhelming positivity—a sonically abundant, rich, lusciously
atmospheric, lovingly produced record.
Early fans of the band’s work, those who haven’t kept track of
the band’s journey in its latter years, might be hard-pressed to
recognize the foursome—comprised of Ryan Delahoussaye, the
band’s multi-instrumentalist; Matt Noveskey on bass; and
brothers Jeremy and Justin Furstenfeld, the band’s drummer and front man, respectively. The group, once known for its stormy dynamic and self-destructive tendencies, couldn’t be more distinct, today, from the band it once was. And the members of Blue October want everyone they encounter to know the great place they’re in, emotionally, physically, and spiritually. “We’ve had the highest of highs and the lowest of lows, and we’ve come out the other side,” says Noveskey, who describes the record as “emotional.”
Such is the subject matter of a soon-to-be-released documentary detailing the band’s transformation from sordid to solid, from ravaged by the tempest of addiction to blessed by the joys of family life. Just like any other relationship, the band’s dynamic is multifaceted, and what we’re privy to on camera is but a snapshot into the group’s complex world.
Mona
Upon leaving the Midwest for Nashville, MONA quickly captured the attention of audiences and critics with driving, post-indie rock delivered with a rebellious energy. Looking back, singer and songwriter Nick Brown describes the band’s vibe with a string of adjectives and nouns: fist pumping, white t-shirts, Marlon Brando, James Dean, sex and God. It all led to a major-label overtures and eventually a deal with Island Def Jam.

As Brown tells it, he and his bandmates were more than happy to embrace the narrative as they were swept along through green rooms, VIP tents, label offices, television studios and the world’s largest festivals. But in the end, major-label life wasn’t the right fit for a band that had approached songwriting, recording and live performance in their own way from day one.

“As much fun as it all was most of the time, we wanted to be more than a trend,”says Brown.

“We’re in this to connect with other humans.

”For Brown and his bandmates, it had always been about connection. The son of a Pentecostal preacher, Brown snuck in rock riffs and built up swagger between Sunday services, well aware of the faith tradition he shared with greats like Johnny Cash, Elvis and Jerry Lee Lewis. In fact, he named the band after this grandmother Mona, a nod to heritage and a bygone era.

“I came from a background of seeing music matter to people,”he says. “I learned early that where people came together for music, there was power.

”Mona got a taste of that power when their self-titled debut was nominated for the BBC Sound of 2011 award and won MTV’s Brand New for 2011. They found themselves playing Later With Jools Holland, Conan and Leno, as well as being named to NME’s Best New Bands. Supporting gigs for Noel Gallagher, Kings Of Leon and other large acts followed, as did appearances at some of the world’s biggest festivals, including Glastonbury, Reading/Leeds, Coachella, Lolla-palooza, Splendour in the Grass and more.

They built on that momentum with a second album, "Torches & Pitchforks", which showcased the band’s seemingly endless reserve of creative energy, and brought focus to their signature sound. The sophomore effort again earned praise from fans and critics worldwide.

Today, on the eve of their third album, the Nashville rockers find themselves brimming with en-ergy and confidence. They’re also now a five-piece, with Zach Lindsay on bass, his brother Alex on guitar, Jordan Young on guitar, and Justin Wilson on drums. They’ve seen a lot in just a few years and have emerged with a renewed sense of purpose and a fresh and vibrant set of newly penned songs that may well be the best of their career. Brown and his bandmates joke about creating a new genre: romantic ambient grunge alt.

With a new label, a new team and an extraordinary new batch of songs, Brown says he’s more proud than ever of the band and the work they are doing. "We have always been a tight knit group, but the vibe is the best’s it’s been and we are looking forward to bringing these songs to the public. Very few things matter in this world, and we think music is one of them
Venue Information:
Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas
3545 Las Vegas Blvd. South
Las Vegas, NV, 89109
http://www.brooklynbowl.com/las-vegas/

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