The Coup (featuring Boots Riley)

The Coup (featuring Boots Riley)

F. Stokes

Thu, March 22, 2012

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

$10 at the door, cash only

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The Coup (featuring Boots Riley)
The Coup (featuring Boots Riley)
The Coup is:

Boots Riley: Lyrics, Vocals, Production, Handclaps, Dancin and Keyboard tweeks.
Pam The Funkstress: Scratches and Poplocking
Silk-E: Vocals and gettin her muthafuckin gig on.
B'nai Rebelfront: Guitar and "not a damn thing else".
J.J. Jungle: Bass, Backflips, and Spins.
Hassan Hurd: Drums and football.
LJ: Organ and other keys.

Montreal Gazette:
"[Boots Riley] is a consummately charismatic front man, establishing
his as one of the best live rap acts
going, after Philadelphia untouchables the Roots."

Austin American-Statesman:
"The Coup isn't a rock 'n' roll band. It's a hip-hop band. But they
are a miracle of everyday life and
proved it at Emo's on Saturday night. I have no idea when the Coup
turned into one of the best bands on
the planet, but here we are."

Salt Lake Tribune:
"The Coup now rules my world... possibly the best show I've seen this
year... Riley is one magnetic
frontman. If The Coup come back, don't miss the show."

Orange County Register:
"...after this tremendous breakthrough set [Coachella Festival], I
can't imagine the Coup will remain hip-
hop's best kept secret anymore."

SmokingSection.com:
"Every time I see them they rock progressively harder...the whole
house [was] going buck, even the
cranky-ass security guard...crazy stage presence."

San Jose Mercury/ Oakland Tribune:
"It's still early, but I'd be surprised if I see anything at Outside
Lands that impresses me more than the
Coup's set. It's always the same deal with this East Bay troupe, led
by genius rapper Boots Riley.
Whether they are playing Coachella or Rock the Bells or, now, Outside,
they always seem to outshine
the competition."

Pitchfork.com:
"Silk E sings and struts like Tina Turner raised on hip-hop."

Los Angeles Times:
"Considerable musical chops... The Coup throws one fine party."

Punknews.com:
"Incendiary... live instrumentation to challenge even the wildest rock music."


About The Coup's "Pick A Bigger Weapon":

"#1 Album of the Year"
-- Associated Press

"#2 Album of the Year"
-- Murder Dog

"#7 Album of the Year"
-- Chicago Tribune

"#8 Album of the Year"
-- The Onion AV Club

"#9 Album of the Year"
-- Washington Post

Billboard says, " The Coup is the best hip-hop act of the past decade."

XXL says, "... the bigger weapon referred to in the album's title is
the increasingly sophisticated live funk
that oozes out of these grooves."

Village Voice says, "Fact is, the brother's some writer... His lesser
songs would be dookie gold on an
ordinary undie-rap album… Their low-slung rhythms imagine what might
have happened if Reagan-era
Prince had been less into getting some action and more into kicking up
some activism, or if P-Funk had
dabbled in politics, as well as psychedelics."


Rolling Stone says, "Riley's rhymes work so well because they're more
about real life than rhetoric... it's
the rare record that makes revolution sound like hot fun on a Saturday night."

PopMatters.com says, "The weapons The Coup use are wit, frankness,
storytelling, poetry, smooth soul
music and raw funk... Musically this is the sexiest Coup album yet."
F. Stokes
F. Stokes
Born on the South Side of Chicago, Rodney “F. Stokes” Lucas was raised in the extreme conditions familiar to the millions of American’s who have experience with America’s urban ghettoes. F.Stokes, the eldest of six siblings, grew up in a single-mother household. In F.Stokes case, the term “household” is a misnomer, as his childhood was characterized by frequent address changes, and a stint at a homeless shelter.




F.Stokes music depicts the stark and brutal realities of the impoverished urban experience. However, F.Stokes chooses not to glamorize the circumstances of his upbringing. Rather than capitalizing on the misconceptions of the modern black experience that have begun to dominate the hip-hop landscape, F.Stokes provides thoughtful insight into the plight of black men in our nation’s largest cities.



Through vivid imagery and skillful wordplay F.Stokes reinterpret the thematic traditions of the soul and blues movements for a new generation of music fans. Beneath F.Stokes undeniable talent as a lyricist, he is driven by a deep sense of responsibility to promote progress and compassion with his music.