WETLANDS Class Of â96, 15 Year Reunion Party, Ulu, Fat Mama

WETLANDS Class Of ’96, 15 Year Reunion Party

Ulu

Fat Mama

Sun, September 11, 2011

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

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Ulu
Ulu
Known for their original blend of experimental jazz/funk/rock, booty-shaking grooves, dynamic live shows, and a looney version of the Super Mario Brothers theme song, ulu was a hard-edged instrumental group out of the NuGroove/Jamband scene from 1996-2004.

During the bands’ eight-year tenure, they toured the United States relentlessly and recorded four albums with various different lineups. Their grassroots fan-base was spread throughout the country, but ulu’s true home was always in downtown Manhattan with regular appearances at The Wetlands Preserve and The Knitting Factory.

On September 11, 2001, the band was on a brief tour break at home in New York, bearing witness to and living through the horrible events that would forever change the world. Just two days later, ulu hit the road once again and became de facto ambassadors of NYC, sharing their personal tales of both hope and tragedy with every performance.

It certainly is fitting that the original quintet will climb out of retirement for the 10th anniversary of September 11th to play three shows in memory of the indelible mark made on the city of New York, on the band, and on its fans.

The 5 founding members have only shared the stage once since they parted ways in 1999. Their sound was lovingly and respectfully coined “gumby-textured squonk” by Richard Gehr of the Village Voice.

ulu is:

Luca Benedetti – guitar

Scott Chasolen – keys

Aaron Gardner – sax and flute

David Hoffman – drums

Justin Wallace - bass
Fat Mama
Fat Mama
Fat Mama (1996-2000) was an eight piece collective primarily comprised of University Of Colorado Jazz students quickly known around the early Jam Band scene as one of the most forward thinking and furiously adventurous groups around. Their moniker taken from Herbie Hancock's "Fat Mama Rotunda" was a direct homage to their sound. Borrowing heavily from the early 70's music of Miles, Hancock, and Mahavishnu, Fat Mama focused heavily on improvisation and would soon delve deeper into the Avant-Garde and New York's exploratory Downtown Jazz scene. After releasing three records and traveling for four years both the 90's and Fat Mama would come to an end.