Robert Randolph and The Family Band

Robert Randolph and The Family Band

Lawrence, Cameron Calloway

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

7:30 pm

$20.00 - $37.50 +

This event is 18 and over

$20 general admission. $22.50 day of show.

$37.50 VIP Lounge.

 

 

All guests must have a valid government/state issued ID for entry to the venue. No refunds.


TICKETS PURCHASED IN PERSON AT THE BOX OFFICE INCLUDE A $2 BOX OFFICE FEE

 

All general admission tickets are standing room only.

 

ALL TICKET PRICES INCLUDE NEVADA'S 9% LIVE ENTERTAINMENT TAX

 


Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas is excited to offer special room discounts via Caesars Hotels & Resorts for traveling fans. For hotel rooms use promo code: BRB15 at www.caesars.com applicable for rooms at The LINQ Hotel and the Flamingo.

 

*Advertised times are for doors -- show time not available until day of show*

Robert Randolph and The Family Band
Robert Randolph and The Family Band
Many musicians claim that they “grew up in the church,” but for Robert Randolph that is literally the case. The renowned pedal steel guitarist, vocalist and songwriter led such a cloistered childhood and adolescence that he heard no secular music while growing up. If it wasn’t being played inside of the House of God Church in Orange, New Jersey—quite often by Robert and members of his own family, who upheld a long but little known gospel music tradition called sacred steel—Randolph simply didn’t know it existed.

Which makes it all the more remarkable that the leader of Robert Randolph and the Family Band—whose label debut for Sony Masterworks, Got Soul, will be released on Feb. 17, 2017—is today an inspiration to the likes of Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana and Derek Trucks, all of whom have played with him and studied his technique. It wasn’t until he was out of his teens that Randolph broke away from the confines of his social and musical conditioning and discovered rock, funk, soul, jazz and the jam band scene, soon forging his own sound by fusing elements of those genres.

“It was all church music. It was a movement within our church and that’s all we used to do,” says Randolph of the sacred steel music he played at the time, music whose association with his church stretches back to the 1920s. Once Randolph began to discover other forms of music, he saw how they were all connected, and was eager to find his own place. “All music is related. Gospel is the same as blues,” he says. “The only thing that changes is in hardcore gospel people are singing about God and Jesus and in the blues people are singing about ‘my baby left me’ and whiskey. When we first started out, guys really weren’t allowed to leave the church. I was the one that stepped out and started this thing. My dad would say, ‘Why do you come home smelling like beer and cigarettes?’ ‘Well, we just got done playing some smoky club till 2 a.m.!’ It was all foreign and different.”

By the early 2000s, Randolph had begun applying his dazzling steel guitar technique to secular music, and from that grew the Family Band. The group’s sound was so different than anything else around that they were soon packing New York City clubs. Their first album, 2002’s Live at the Wetlands, was recorded at the now defunct jam band haven, and was followed by four studio albums and another live set, each widening the band’s audience—they’ve long been regulars on the festival circuit—and broadening their stylistic range as well.

“Things happened really fast,” Randolph says now. “When I look back on that time, to be honest, I had no idea what the hell we were doing. We’d get told, ‘You guys are going on tour with Eric Clapton.’ ‘Oh, OK.’ I thought, this guy must not have a clue who I am but the first time I met him we talked for about an hour and played music backstage.”

The Family Band’s improvisational skills quickly made them mega-popular among the jam-band crowd, but for Randolph and his band mates, what they were doing was just an extension of what they’d always done. “The jam band scene has that name but it’s really a true music art form scene where you can just be who you are,” Randolph says. “We fit in that category in some sense but the jam band scene itself has changed a lot since that time. I’ve grown to like songs and I like to jam within the song.”

On Got Soul, Robert Randolph and the Family Band walk that line deftly, displaying their virtuosity within the context of a dozen smartly crafted tunes. “I like both playing live and recording,” says Randolph. “The thing about a record is you get a chance to rehearse parts and fine-tune things. But if you look at most great music artists—people like Stevie Wonder—the song is totally different from the show. When you’re in the studio, it’s hard to improvise without an audience. But for us, well, we’ve been playing in front of audiences our whole lives.”
Lawrence
After years of consuming Stevie Wonder, Janis Joplin, and Eggo waffles, Lawrence delivers Breakfast, their twelve-song debut LP. Led by siblings Clyde Lawrence, 22, and Gracie Lawrence, 18, the New York-based soul-pop group blends old-school and new-school vibes to create a set of songs that sound as good on the record as they do at their high-energy live shows.

To create Breakfast, Lawrence teamed up with Grammy Award winning producer Eric Krasno (Lettuce/Soulive/Tedeschi Trucks Band), and brought in several NYC soul/funk mainstays including Adam Deitch (Lettuce), Cory Henry (Snarky Puppy), and Maurice “Mobetta” Brown (Tedeschi Trucks Band) for guest appearances. Following two short runs with Blues Traveler, Lawrence is in the midst of its first national headline tour.

Clyde and Gracie have been writing and playing music together since their early childhood, performing regularly at small cafés and clubs around lower Manhattan, and of course, in their living room at their grandparents’ request. During Clyde’s time at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, they met the crew of talented musicians that would ultimately form the full-time Lawrence lineup, an eight-piece keyboard-driven powerhouse with a dynamic horn section to support the siblings’ explosive vocal arrangements. It was with this group that they began to garner a passionate following at countless venues and colleges across the Northeast.

With Breakfast, Lawrence doesn’t shy away from the oft-maligned idea of “pop” music, but instead is on a mission to write the music they wish “pop” sounded like. They draw from the past and present, combining their love of The Beatles, Randy Newman, and Etta James with Beyonce, Ben Folds, and Amy Winehouse.

In addition to working with Lawrence, Clyde has composed songs and score for films such as Miss Congeniality (2000), Music and Lyrics (2007), The Rewrite (2015), and Hard Sell (2016). At age six, Clyde was admitted as the youngest member to the Songwriters Guild of America for his work on Miss Congeniality (2000). Gracie is also an accomplished actress who has performed on Broadway in Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs, films such as Did You Hear About The Morgans (2009) and The Sitter (2011), and TV shows such as The Good Wife (2012) and The Americans (2014).
Cameron Calloway
Cameron Calloway
Recently named the "soul child" by Coachella Magazine, Gibson/Epiphone artist Cameron Calloway is looking to bring peace, love & soul music to the ears of this world! He brings a Motown Vibe to his songs, feel good pop with straight from his heart passion !

He has shared the stage with acts like Grammy nominated group The Internet, Allen Stone, Emily King, Dru Hill, Mayer Hawthorne & The Stone Foxes. He was also invited to play down at the 11th Annual Joshua Tree Music Festival! Calloway will be releasing his Debut EP in the Summer of 2017!
Venue Information:
Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas
3545 Las Vegas Blvd. South
Las Vegas, NV, 89109
http://www.brooklynbowl.com/las-vegas/

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