The Songs of Barlow performed by Grahame Lesh, Ross James, Alex Koford and Scott Padden with special guests Eric Krasno, Jackie Greene, Rob Barraco  + more!

The Songs of Barlow performed by Grahame Lesh, Ross James, Alex Koford and Scott Padden with special guests Eric Krasno, Jackie Greene, Rob Barraco + more!

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$25.00

This event is 21 and over

Lineup:

 

Grahame Lesh
Ross James
Scott Padden
Alex Koford

 

with featured guests:

 

Eric Krasno (Soulive, Lettuce)
Jackie Greene
Jon Graboff (Ryan Adams & The Cardinals)
Karina Rykman (Marco Benevento Band)
Katie Jacoby
Leslie Mendelson
Rob Barraco (Dark Star Orchestra)

DJ Logic

The Songs of Barlow
The Songs of Barlow (fka The Terrapin Family Band) was formed from weekly shows at Phil Lesh’s Terrapin Crossroads in San Rafael, CA. Terrapin Crossroads' constant free bar shows, often featuring bandleader Phil, have created an opportunity for the young musicians of the band to perform together and with a diverse cast of visiting musicians. Through playing in this setting, and with ongoing mentoring from Phil, The Songs of Barlow has grown into a richly nuanced and fun band, weaving the classics with obscure covers and fresh original music to create a unique musical tapestry.

Lineup:

Grahame Lesh
Ross James
Scott Padden
Alex Koford

with featured guests:

Eric Krasno (Soulive, Lettuce)
Jackie Greene
Jon Graboff (Ryan Adams & The Cardinals)
Karina Rykman (Marco Benevento Band)
Katie Jacoby
Leslie Mendelson
Rob Barraco (Dark Star Orchestra)
DJ Logic
Eric Krasno (Soulive, Lettuce)
Eric Krasno (Soulive, Lettuce)
For nearly two decades, Eric Krasno has been an omnipresent figure in popular music. We've heard his virtuosic, innovative guitar playing with Soulive and Lettuce (both of which he co-founded), seen him onstage supporting the likes of the Rolling Stones and The Roots, watched him take home multiple GRAMMY Awards, and benefited from his deft, behind-the-scenes work as a producer and songwriter for everyone from Norah Jones, Tedeschi Trucks, and 50 Cent to Talib Kweli, Aaron Neville, and Allen Stone. Krasno's rousing new solo album, 'Blood From A Stone,' reveals a previously unknown and utterly compelling side of his artistry, though, inviting us to bear witness as he both literally and metaphorically finds his voice.

"I’ve been writing songs with vocals for other people for a while," explains Krasno, who sings for the first time on 'Blood From A Stone.' "With these songs, we initially wrote them thinking others would sing them, so when I was in the studio with different artists, sometimes I'd introduce one of the tracks and they'd record it, but it wouldn't necessarily work out. Eventually, I realized it was because I'd written these songs for myself."

It might sound strange hearing Krasno discuss the idea of "finding his voice" so deep into a career already chock full of remarkable songwriting, but as he sees it, there's something new, something intimately personal about this album that urged him to step up to the microphone for the first time. And though so much about this album feels like uncharted territory, in some ways, it brings him all the way back to his musical roots.

"Growing up, I listened to Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, and the Grateful Dead, along with a lot of hip-hop," remembers Krasno. "When I linked up with Soulive, we played instrumental music, and that's the path I’ve mostly been on ever since. This record loops back to those initial bands and songs I loved, but with the added experience and influence of the past 20 years."

When it came time to begin formal work on the album, Krasno left his home in New York City to join Dave Gutter from Rustic Overtones in Maine for the first writing session, which turned out to be so productive that the two had penned most of the album in just a few days. In a shift from the looser, jam/funk spirit that has marked Krasno's previous work, the songs for 'Blood From A Stone' took shape as tight, infectious, highly structured blues and R&B-based tracks. Krasno and Gutter commiserated over recent relationship turmoil and their shared love of music like Bobby “Blue” Bland's ‘Dreamer’ and Muddy Waters' ‘Electric Mud’ to create a sonic palette at once classic and modern, deeply personal and totally timeless. Deciding to strike while the iron was hot, the duo headed into Gutter's barn along with Ryan Zoidis (Lettuce) to lay down what they envisioned to be demos, but in fact turned out to be the backbone of the album.

"We set up an old tape machine and pieced together gear and borrowed microphones and cobbled a little studio together," remembers Krasno. "It was one of those things where, once people heard the songs we were coming up with, every musician in town started coming by with gear and helping out. We didn't realize we were actually making the record, so there was no pressure, and that let us experiment in really cool ways. There's a lot of rawness to the recordings, and that really bled into the performances and my vocal delivery."

It's apparent from the first moments of the funky, Hendrix-esque album opener "Waiting On Your Love" that Krasno's voice has been an ace up his sleeve this whole time. Rich, warm, and full-bodied, his tone blends earnest sincerity with casual swagger and, much like his guitar playing, taps into a deep vein of emotion. On "Torture" and "Jezebel," he sings as a bruised survivor of love-gone-bad, while the slow-jam of "Please Ya" channels Otis Redding soul, and "On The Rise" builds off a bass-and-percussion groove with psychedelic samples and gorgeous harmonies. The album has its lighter moments, too, from "Unconditional Love"—inspired by the spirit-lifting arrival of Gutter's daughter after school every day—to "Natalie"—a romantic ode to an automobile originally written during Krasno's Soulive days. It's an eclectic collection, to be sure, but it's all tied beautifully together through Krasno's understated vocals and skillful songcraft, which always leaves enough room for him to stretch out on his six-string.

As brilliant as Krasno's guitar work is throughout the album, though, Derek Trucks arrives as a special guest on "Curse Lifter"—a hypnotic instrumental that lands somewhere between Santana and the Allman Brothers—to give him a real run for his money.

"Derek is my favorite guitar player in the world," says Krasno. "I've known him for close to 20 years, because the first national tour Soulive ever did was with the Derek Trucks Band, and we've been super close ever since. I've watched him progress into the best, and it was really important to have him on this record."

The track's gorgeous, evocative guitar harmonies are a fitting way of bringing things full circle for Krasno, who's so often utilized his guitar in the service of others. In the end, he may not have drawn blood from a stone, but Krasno discovered deep wells of soul and untapped reservoirs of talent by recording this album, and he opened up entirely new worlds for himself as an artist in the process.

"It's something I didn’t know was there," he concludes. "I would have been totally content just being a guitar player and writing songs for other people, but this inspiration just happened, and I'm really glad it did, because it's changed things. I didn't know I had this in me.”
Jackie Greene
Jackie Greene
"We live in such a fast-paced, hectic environment, I wanted to make a record that would invite people to step back and take their time to listen," Jackie Greene says of Back to Birth, his first album in five years. "I wanted to make a record that would reward people who are willing to sit down and give it a couple of serious listens."

Back to Birth - Greene's seventh album and his Yep Roc Records debut - is more than worthy of some serious attention. The 11-song set showcases the multitalented artist's uncanny knack for synthesizing his deep affinity for American roots styles into timeless, personally-charged music. Armed with a persuasive voice, a vivid songwriting skill and an instinctive mastery of several instruments, Greene has carved out a unique musical niche, and the album marks another creative landmark in his already compelling body of work.

Produced by Los Lobos member and frequent Greene collaborator Steve Berlin, Back to Birth underlines Greene's remarkable evolution as a performer and writer. With such new compositions as "Silver Lining," "Trust Somebody," "Now I Can See For Miles," and the stirring title track, the artist's distinctive melodic sensibility is matched with thoughtful, introspective lyrics that confront some profound philosophical issues with plainspoken eloquence.

"Musically, this album is kind of a return to the simplicity of the records that I started with, although I feel like I have a much better idea of what I'm doing now," Greene observes. "I think the lyrics are the part that have really evolved. A lot of these songs explore the notion of a cyclical existence, and the sense that life goes in a circle. I want the songs to come from a place that's meaningful to me, but I also want to keep them as simple and direct as I can. I look at old blues songs, or Hank Williams songs, and they're so simple and direct but they can convey some pretty deep ideas."

Although Back to Birth is Greene's first new solo release in five years, he's hardly been idle. In fact, he's spent much of the past few years engaging in a series of collaborative musical adventures that have teamed him with several notable veterans.

In 2013, Greene joined the reunited Black Crowes as lead guitarist on their worldwide tour, and the following year released the self-titled debut album of supergroup Trigger Hippy, which Greene is a member of along with Joan Osborne and Crowes drummer Steve Gorman. Greene continues to be a frequent member of Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh's touring ensemble Phil Lesh & Friends, for which he has contributed lead guitar and vocals since 2007. Greene also toured as part of WRG, an acoustic trio with the Grateful Dead's Bob Weir and Black Crowes frontman Chris Robinson, and he performed with Levon Helm as part of Helm's fabled Midnight Ramble shows.

The same qualities that attracted such legendary figures to work with Greene are prominent throughout Back to Birth, which Greene and producer Berlin cut at Portland's Supernatural Sound with a sympathetic crew of mostly jazz-steeped players, with Greene stretching out on a number of instruments, including guitar, piano, organ and drums.

"This is the third album I've done with Steve," he says. "I've known him for about 12 years, and he's really good at challenging me and getting it out of me. We know each other well enough at this point that we can be blunt with each other, and he'll tell me that I'm full of it if that's what I need to hear."

The musical passion and creative integrity that drive Back to Birth have been constants in Jackie Greene's musical life from the start. While growing up in Northern California, he taught himself to play piano and guitar. His musical reference points shifted radically when, at the age of 14, he ran across a cache of his parents' vintage rock, country, blues and R&B LPs in the family's basement.

Still in his teens and inspired by his discoveries, Greene began writing songs and performing them at a local coffeehouse while recording his compositions in his makeshift garage studio and burning CDRs to sell at his gigs. He saved the money he made selling those discs to fund his debut album, the self-produced, self-released Rusty Nails. Despite being a D.I.Y. release with minimal promotion, the disc received substantial regional attention from fans and press alike.

His popularity led to a deal with a local independent label, which released his second album, Gone Wanderin', in late 2002. The disc won considerable national attention, leading to a series of national tours opening for the likes of B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Susan Tedeschi, Huey Lewis, Mark Knopfler and Taj Mahal.

Greene continued to win critical acclaim and expand his fan base with 2004's Sweet Somewhere Bound and 2006's American Myth. In 2007, Greene began moonlighting with Phil Lesh and Friends, while continuing his own musical evolution with his own releases Giving Up the Ghost and Till the Light Comes, released in 2008 and 2010, respectively.

"The musicians that I really admire and try to emulate are the ones who have the whole package: they're great songwriters, great singers and great instrumentalists, and they have a vibe about them that's real," he states, adding, "When I go to make a record, I'm not thinking about where I can fit in a bunch of guitar solos. I'm thinking, 'What does this song feel like? What's it saying?' So my goal, when writing a song or making a record, is to find the core of that emotional experience and convey that."

Although he's already racked up a multitude of impressive musical achievements, Greene isn't one to look back. Instead, he continues to look to the future - and looks forward to getting back on the road to bring Back to Birth's soulful songcraft to the loyal, wildly diverse fan base that he's built through talent, vision and hard work.

"I still plan on making a lot of different kinds of records in the future, but I can't tell you what they're going to sound like, because I really have no idea," he asserts. "All I can do is write songs and make music as honestly as I can. That's what I believe people appreciate about what I do. They trust me to be honest with them, and I'd never want to abuse that trust."
Rob Barraco (Dark Star Orchestra; Phil Lesh & Friends)
Rob has played music on both keyboard and guitar since the age of 6 and has been a professional musician all his adult life. For over ten years in the ‘80s and early ‘90s he was keyboardist for the hit TV show The Cosby Show and its spin off It's A Different World.

Rob toured with R&B sensation Freddie Jackson in the late '80s before joining The Zen Tricksters. Rob spent eleven years touring and recording with The Tricksters turning out two studio albums and playing live shows across the US and Canada. It was their second album, A Love Surreal, that caught Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh's ear.

Phil summoned Rob and Trickster guitarist Jeff Mattson to play a series of shows in San Francisco and then on to tour the country double billing with Bob Dylan. That band included drummer extraordinaire John Molo, boy wiz Derek Trucks, and the ubiquitous Warren Haynes. The following year one of the great jam bands of all time was formed with Phil, Rob, John, Warren and the guitar giant Jimmy Herring. This band would forever be known as The Q (short for The Phil Lesh Quintet). They went on to tour the country for three years and put out one studio album, There and Back Again.

In 2002 Barraco joined with the original members of the Grateful Dead for the Alpine Valley reunion shows and then toured with them in 2002 and 2003. In 2004 he joined Chris Robinson's New Earth Mud. In 2005, he toured with Dark Star Orchestra after the tragic death of keyboardist Scott Larned, joining the band full-time shorly thereafter.

Rob has one solo CD co-written with Robert Hunter titled When We All Come Home.
Venue Information:
Brooklyn Bowl
61 Wythe Avenue
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
http://www.brooklynbowl.com/

Just Announced

More Shows

View Calendar>

Search Shows

Join the Mailing List