August Burns Red

MESSENGERS 10 YEAR TOUR

August Burns Red

Protest The Hero, In Hearts Wake, '68

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

6:00 pm

$23.00 - $459.03

This event is all ages

$23 in advance. $25 day of show.

 

All guests must have a valid government issued ID for entry to the venue. No refunds.


TICKETS PURCHASED IN PERSON AT THE BOX OFFICE INCLUDE A $2 BOX OFFICE FEE

 

All general admission tickets are standing room only.

 

ALL TICKET PRICES INCLUDE NEVADA'S 9% LIVE ENTERTAINMENT TAX

 


Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas is excited to offer special room discounts via Caesars Hotels & Resorts for traveling fans. For hotel rooms use promo code: BRB15 at www.caesars.com applicable for rooms at The LINQ Hotel and the Flamingo.

 

*Advertised times are for doors -- show time not available until day of show*

August Burns Red
August Burns Red
There are a galaxy's worth of metal bands active today. But stare at all of those stars long enough and some lines start to form; everything starts to take shape. The Constellations begin to bloom.

Just two years ago, Lancaster, PA's August Burns Red were, to the naked eye, just another young band jockeying for position in the modern metal scene. Then came Messengers, the band's 2007 full-length release for Solid State Records, and a new frontrunner emerged. Without hype, devoid of any smoke and mirrors, the album debuted at 81 on the Billboard charts, going on to ever-so-quietly sell more than 80,000 copies. Fueled only by the honesty and dynamism of the music, fans multiplied exponentially, driving ABR's MySpace plays well past the 17 million mark and flocking to the band's 2008 headlining tour – which included sold-out venues across the country.

Meanwhile, August Burns Red kept their heads down, conquering fans at Warped Tour, on the Take Action tour and at destinations from Dubai to Dallas, and increased their profile through placement of their beloved take on "Carol of the Bells" on the movie trailer for "The Spirit." The band also packed up their Phillies T-shirts and ever-present flip-flops and headed overseas for a tour of 12 countries throughout the UK and Europe. The star was shining bright. "It's extremely encouraging to see your band growing," says guitarist and primary songwriter JB Brubaker with characteristic modesty. "It helps keep you motivated and forces you to set the bar higher so that you can continue to grow and put out the best music you're capable of writing."

To that end – the band returned to the studio this past February to record its hotly anticipated follow-up with lauded producer Jason Suecof (Sevendust, All That Remains, Trivium). Fans flocked to the band's in-studio Stickam site by the tens of thousands to observe the band recording the album in real time. The result was Constellations, the third full-length offering from August Burns Red, set for release on July 14. A crushing metal tour de force, the album pushes ABR's trademark aural blitz into directions previously unexplored by the band. "We spread our creative wings a bit on Constellations," says JB. "But I can say for sure that this record will definitely be as unrelenting as our previous ones." Accenting the blistering guitar work and syncopated breakdowns that August Burns Red fans have grown to love are dynamics previously unexplored by the band. Constellations features more diverse tempos and cohesive song compositions than on previous ABR records, as well as the band's maiden voyage to the land of guitar solos.

"We've managed to push ourselves as musicians, as lyricists and performers," says drummer Matt Greiner. "As a whole, I feel like we're expanding, reinterpreting and refining our sound." That kind of sonic wanderlust has pushed August Burns Red since the members first united in 2003 while still in high school. Armed with fearless innovation, uncanny technical ability and an innate near-classical songwriting style, the band started turning heads immediately upon the release of its 2005 Solid State debut, Thrill Seeker. The band's 2007 sleeper hit, Messengers, minted ABR as one of the pacesetters of the next generation of metal bands. The band has already proven to be the type that gets kids to put down Guitar Hero and pick up an actual guitar – look no further than the number of bands on MySpace that list ABR as an influence. With Constellations, that swelling army of fans will make sure that there's a racket from day one. "I am probably as excited for Constellations to come out as our most diehard fans," Brubaker exclaims. "I'd like to think there is something for everyone on the new album."

Already one of the year's most anticipated metal albums, Constellations will make good on the promise of the past two years, and will serve as proof-positive that August Burns Red's success is no mere solar flare-up. This supernova's here to stay.
Protest The Hero
Protest The Hero
Hi, I'm Protest The Hero. I've been alive for 20 years now, and I finally have my own kitchen. I'm very excited about this, and generally excited by anything else that falls into the "cute" or "cozy" categories. I learned to play guitar when I was twelve fro m this guy named Ronnie who came over to fix my parents' computer. I like quilts. But that's probably because I'm always freezing cold. I LOVE Nashville. That's where I live, when I'm lucky enough to be there. I love the town so much, I sometimes feel like I should just roll the windows down in my car (nicknamed the Toyoat. Because it's a Toyota) and scream "I LOVE THIS TOWN" loudly out the windows. That wouldn't be weird, right? Every time I try and wink at someone, I mess it up and end up scaring people. My lucky number always has been and always will be 13. It pops up in front of me in the most obvious and undeniable ways, but only when something good is about to happen. I'm a Sagittarius. I think that means I'm always looking for something new. It also means I have a Christmas-themed birthday party every year. I love bright colors and things that make reality seem more whimsical than it is. I have a collection of ribbons and headbands, and I love them all the same. I over-think and over-plan and over-organize. I've been like this since I was a baby, before I was gigantically tall and over-talkative. These days, I've been trying to classify my thoughts into two categories: "Things I can change," and "Things I can't." It seems to help me sort through what to really stress about. But there I go again, over-planning and over-organizing my over-thinking! I write songs about my adventures and misadventures, most of which concern love. Love is a tricky business. But if it wasn't, I wouldn't be so enthralled with it. Lately I've come to a wonderful realization that makes me even more fascinated by it: I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to love. No one does! There's no pattern to it, except that it happens to all of us, of course. I can't plan for it. I can't predict how it'll end up. Because love is unpredictable and it's frustrating and it's tragic and it's beautiful. And even though there's no way to feel like I'm an expert at it, it's worth writing songs about -- more than anything else I've ever experienced in my life. I've apparently been the victim of growing up, which apparently happens to all of us at one point or another. It's been going on for quite some time now, without me knowing it. I've found that growing up can mean a lot of things. For me, it doesn't mean I should become somebody completely new and stop loving the things I used to love. It means I've just added more things to my list. Like for example, I'm still beyond obsessed with the winter season and I still start putting up strings of lights in September. I still love sparkles and grocery shopping and really old cats that are only nice to you half the time. I still love writing in my journal and wearing dresses all the time and staring at chandeliers. But some new things I've fallen in love with -- mismatched everything. Mismatched chairs, mismatched colors, mismatched personalities. I love spraying perfumes I used to wear when I was in high school. It brings me back to the days of trying to get a close parking spot at school, trying to get noticed by soccer players, and trying to figure out how to avoid doing or saying anything uncool, and wishing every minute of every day that one day maybe I'd get a chance to win a Grammy. Or something crazy and out of reach like that. ;) I love old buildings with the paint chipping off the walls and my dad's stories about college. I love the freedom of living alone, but I also love things that make me feel seven again. Back then naivety was the norm and skepticism was a foreign language, and I just think every once in a while you need fries and a chocolate milkshake and your mom. I love picking up a cookbook and closing my eyes and opening it to a random page, then attempting to make that recipe. I've loved my fans from the very first day, but they've said things and done things recently that make me feel like they're my friends -- more now than ever before. I'll never go a day without thinking about our memories together. For the last three years, I've been writing and recording an album yet to be titled. I only have the option of writing about things that happen in my life, so thankfully a LOT has happened in my life in the last two years. I know I don't always say the right thing at the right time or speak up when I should, but I write it all down. I get my guitar and a pen and all of a sudden, I have a chance to say exactly what I meant to say in real life. Some of the things I wrote about are things everyone saw me go through. Some of the things I wrote about are things nobody ever knew about. I'm beyond excited for you to hear these stories and confessions. I think it's important that you know that I will never change. But I'll never stay the same either. Must be a Sagittarius thing. I'm pretty stoked that you read this whole thing. I commend you for that. This was ridiculously long, and you probably have other stuff you could've done in the last four minutes. So to you, or anyone else who has spent four minutes on me in some way-- listening to just one song, or watching one of my videos….Thank you. I love you like I love sparkles and having the last word. And that's real love. --Protest The Hero
In Hearts Wake
Nature is known for camouflaging power. A great wave begins as a ripple; an iceberg hides its bulk under the surface. Nowhere is this more evident than what lies above us, behind the veil of the beautiful blue sky lies the infinite universe.

A closely guarded secret, In Hearts Wake's third album Skydancer has been lying dormant for well over a year. Recorded alongside Earthwalker – In Hearts Wake's award-winning ARIA Top Five sophomore album – in Michigan with Josh Schroeder (The Color Morale, King 810) in late 2013, the album is both a stunningly assured heavy record in its own right as well as a companion to its predecessor. What frontman Jake Taylor, guitarists Ben Nairne and Eaven Dall, bassist Kyle Erich and drummer Caleb Burton have unveiled is nothing short of the most ambitious and heartfelt album of 2015.

"The tracks on Earthwalker were more focused, personal, emotional and subjective," says Taylor, "whereas the topics on Skydancer were written more from an eagle eye's point of view on the broader issues of the world. It's important to understand that both are very relative."

The existence of Skydancer makes perfect sense when placed next to 2014's Earthwalker – after all, with the earlier album focusing on the feminine beauty and unpredictable chaos of Mother Nature, the sometimes-dark masculine power of Father Sky brings everything into sharp contrast. The concept is drawn from the Native American creation myth that details the attraction and mutual dependence between the two. "Modern society currently treats the masculine and feminine worlds as very separate: from law to religion, social to political and from health to commerce," notes Taylor. "As a species, we cannot survive or reproduce in harmony without the union of both, and this is the same sacred cycle found within nature. Earthwalker (the feminine) and Skydancer (the masculine) illustrate both worlds, and aim to bridge the connection."

Hence the constant dialogue on Skydancer between the personal and the political, the intimate and the social. Our generation's decisions will impact the planet – both positively and negatively – more drastically than arguably any other before us, so the need for people to be conscious of the systems that control us and how they affect us on a human level is huge. These issues affect all of us, whether we like it or not. Our choice is whether or not to be conscious, whether or not to fight back.

This battle reached Taylor's own doorstep, as he recounts in 'Cottonmouth'. His grandmother was ill in a nursing home, but it wasn't clear what was causing her more pain – the illness, the neglect or the medication? "Twenty-odd pills a day to combat her rapidly deteriorating physical condition. Each pill produced a side effect that required a prescription by the other. Behind Western medicine there's a pharmaceutical war being waged by multi-billion dollar corporations, churning profit at the expense of others. I symbolised the pharmaceutical evil with the deadly Cottonmouth viper. It is said that the white lining of the snake's mouth is the last thing victims will see."

Lead single 'Breakaway' perfectly encapsulates the harsh realities of man's inhumanity to both man and planet, takes on those who seek to profit from mass murder on an industrial scale. "Compared to tracks on Earthwalker it's more rigid, punchier, faster, and aggressive, which for me sparked the need to speak about the harsh shadows of war and those that financially fuel it – a fragmented figment of the masculine psyche."

The genesis of the project came when the band collectively reached breaking point. Touring for the sake of touring wasn't enough, and something had to change. "We found ourselves asking the question, what is it all for?" remembers Taylor. "This was the turning point that we needed to create a real purpose to get out of bed for (or off the floor in the case of touring). At the source of it all, we just love feeling healthy and getting outdoors – it's exhilarating. So we wanted to create a side that would stand for what we loved and believed in. No longer were we spectators, we wanted to be a part of the bigger picture so that one day our children might (hopefully) enjoy the Earth as much as we did."

Any journey begins with a single step. In Hearts Wake might be idealists but they also know how to express those ideals in real terms; just as through the course of the 'Earthwalker' campaign they planted 1,379 trees and revitalised a small patch of the planet in the process, with Skydancer they're seeking to make even more of a difference.

By working with non-profit organisation Economics Of Happiness they are combating the creeping insidiousness of globalisation by working to promote local economies and produce. "There are over seven billion people out there, so at the end of the day we can only make a small difference to the bigger picture," smiles Taylor. "But hey – it's still a difference! If more and more people become aware of the real issues at hand rather than who won the latest talent quest, then the difference will start to grow on a much larger scale. We'd like to prove to both ourselves and the world, that if a bunch of average dudes from a tiny coastal town in the most isolated country in the world can make a difference, then anyone can."
'68
In Humor and Sadness, the debut album from '68, demonstrates the loud beauty of alarming simplicity. A guy bashing his drums, another dude wielding a guitar like a percussive, blunt weapon while howling into a mic somehow manages to sound bigger and brasher than the computerized bombast of every six-piece metal band. A splash of roots, a soulful yearning for mid century Americana and the fiery passion of post punk ferocity rampages over a record of earnestly forceful tracks like a runaway locomotive.

Josh Scogin wasn't out of elementary school when the Flat Duo Jets laid their first album down on two tracks in a garage. But the scrappy band's spirit of raw power, punchy delivery, tried-and-true rhythms and urgent sense of immediacy is alive and well in '68.

Heralded by Alternative Press as one of 2014's Most Anticipated Albums, In Humor and Sadness is a snapshot of a fiery new beginning for one of modern Metalcore's most celebrated frontmen. Produced by longtime Scogin collaborator Matt Goldman (Underoath, Anberlin, The Devil Wears Prada), the first full offering from '68 is a broad reaching slab of ambitious showmanship delivered with few tools and fewer pretensions. The scratchy disharmonic pop of Nirvana's Bleach is in there, for sure. And while many associate the setup with The Black Keys, '68 is more like Black Keys on crack.

"I wanted it to be as loud and obnoxious as it can be," Scogin explains. "I want it to be in-your-face. I want people who hear us live to just be like, 'There's no way this is just two dudes!' That became sort of the subplot to our entire existence. 'How much noise can two guys make?' It's obviously very minimalistic, but in other ways, it's very big. I have as many amps onstage as a five piece band. Michael only has one cymbal and one tom on his kit, but he plays it like it's some kind of big '80s metal drum setup. It's minimalistic, but it's also overkill. We get as much as we can from as little as we can."

Like many pioneers, North Carolina's the Flat Duo Jet's blazed a trail for more commercially successful people. They played rootsy rockabilly but with a punk edge. Band leader Dexter Romweber's solo work was a fist-pounding celebration of audacity and disruption, which influenced the likes of The White Stripes, among other bands.

"I got excited when I thought about the distress, the chaos that this two-piece arrangement would create – one guy having to provide all of these sounds, with a bunch of pedals, with certain chords wigging out and missing notes here and there," he says with excitement. "That alone makes up for the chaos of having five people up there."

That idea of less is more, of building something big from something small, persists today at the top of the charts with The Black Keys, just as it's lived and breathed in the bass-player-less eclectic trio Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, the rule-breaking early '90s destruction of Washington D.C.'s Nation of Ulysses, and in the two man attack of '68.

"Jon Spencer's records always sound like he's kind of winging it and I love that," declares Scogin, letting out an affectionate laugh. "In my last band, that's how we tried to make our last record feel. The excitement and imperfection is something I love to draw from."

Before paring (and pairing) things down with friend and drummer Michael McClellan, Josh Scogin was the voice, founder and agitprop-style provocateur in The Chariot, who laid waste to convention across a brilliantly unhinged and defiantly unpolished catalog of Noisecore triumphs and dissonant art rock rage. Recorded live in the studio, overdub free, The Chariot's first album set the tone for a decade to come, owing more to a band like Unsane than whatever passes for "scene."

Scogin was the original singer for Norma Jean and left an influential imprint on the burgeoning Metalcore of the late 90s that persists today, despite having fronted the band for just one of six albums. Whether it's the genre-defining heft of Norma Jean's first album or the five records and stage destroying shows of The Chariot, there's a single constant at the heart of Josh Scogin's career: a familiarity with the unfamiliar.

A new Metalcore band would be a safe third act for the subculture lifer, but Scogin isn't comfortable unless he's making himself (and his audience) uncomfortable. "I definitely wanted to flip the script a bit," he freely confesses. "I've always wanted to play guitar and sing in a band, ever since I left Norma Jean. I needed the freedom of not having a guitar onstage, but now having done that for several years, I wanted the challenge."

Creative problem solving has long been the name of the game for Scogin, whether he was hand stamping ALL 30,000 CDs for The Chariot's Wars and Rumors of Wars album or figuring out how to pull off his '68 song title concept in the digital age of iTunes. Each song on In Humor and Sadness was to be titled with simply a single letter, which when put together vertically on the back of a vinyl LP or compact disc, would spell out a word. However, it's problematic to name more than one song with the same letter, which would have been necessary to spell out what he intended.

'68 is the forward thinking progress of an artist who finds satisfaction in the expression of dissatisfaction. There's progression in this regression. Tear apart all of the elements that have enveloped a singer's performance, strap a guitar on the guy and set him loose with nothing but a beat behind him? It's a recipe for inventive, fanciful mayhem.

After a raucous debut at South By Southwest, a full US tour supporting Chiodos and many more road gigs on the horizon, Scogin and McClellan are propelled by the excitement that comes along with the knowledge that '68 is truly just getting started.

"We've just broken the tip of the iceberg. We're really just exploring all the different things we can do," Scogin promises. "I'll get more pedals, we're try different auxiliary instruments, whatever – the goal is to challenge ourselves and challenge an audience."
Venue Information:
Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas
3545 Las Vegas Blvd. South
Las Vegas, NV, 89109
http://www.brooklynbowl.com/las-vegas/

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